Monday, October 05, 2009

Polls show global warming nothing to be scared of.

Polls, polls and more polls.

In the poll results below I suppose it depends on what people perceive as "scare worthy". Whilst man made global warming is most probably occurring as I write I am not personally "scared". I might be if I lived on the coast of Bangladesh though.

Lawrence Solomon: The end is near [National Post]

I know that the global warming scare is over but for the shouting because that’s what the polls show, at least those in the U.S., where unlike Canada the public is polled extensively on global warming. Most Americans don’t blame humans for climate change — they consider global warming to be a natural phenomenon. Even when the polls showed the public believed man was responsible for global warming, the public didn’t take the scare seriously. When asked to rank global warming’s importance compared to numerous other concerns — unemployment, trade, health care, poverty, crime, and education among them — global warming came in dead last. Fewer than 1% chose global warming as scare-worthy.


At least "Business" is taking it seriously. The quote below links to a previous post - now carbon subsidies are out there everyone is trying to profit maximize by gaming the system. Entirely rational.

None of this matters anymore, I recently heard at the Global Business Forum in Banff, where a fellow panelist from the Pew Centre on Global Climate Change told the audience that, while she couldn’t dispute the claims I had made about the science being dubious, the rights and wrongs in the global warming debate are no longer relevant. “The train has left the station,” she cheerily told the business audience, meaning that the debate is over, global warming regulations are coming in, and everyone in the room — primarily business movers and shakers from Western Canada — had better learn to adapt.

Her advice was well accepted, chiefly because most in the room had already adapted — they are busy trying to cash in by obtaining carbon subsidies, building nuclear plants, or providing services to the new carbon economy.


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2 comments:

Eric Eckl said...

I think part of the reason that concern seems to be dropping is that environmental advocates have basically dropped the term "global warming" for "climate change." Environmental polls and surveys find that "climate change" is not nearly as attention grabbling as "global warming." It's at least partially a case of poor environmental communication.

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