Friday, July 30, 2010

Economics in everything: "School Shootings and Student Performance"

Occasionally an economics paper is written that transcends the limited remit of "globalisation and the environment". This paper appears to say alot about the thinking of economists - I make no further comment.

I can imagine many members of the general public up in arms shouting "how could they" and other similar phrases.

The results seem reasonable though. In a seminar I would be tempted to ask for the "policy implications" of these results. Given the relatively infrequent number of school shootings, knowing the impact on exam results may not be considered of the utmost importance.

Why would young men be affected more than young women?

"School Shootings and Student Performance"

CESifo Working Paper Series No. 3114
PANU POUTVAARA, University of Helsinki - Department of Economics, Helsinki Center of Economic Research (HECER), CESifo (Center for Economic Studies and Ifo Institute for Economic Research), Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA)

OLLI TAPANI ROPPONEN, University of Helsinki - Department of Economics

In this paper, we study how high school students reacted to the shocking news of a school shooting. The shooting coincided with national high-school matriculation exams. As there were exams both before and after the shooting, we can use a difference-in-differences analysis to uncover how the school shooting affected the test scores compared to previous years. We find that the average performance of young men declined due to the school shooting, whereas we do not observe a similar pattern for women.

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"The undeniables": Top Ten Climate Change Indicators

Top ten lists are always good for a "google hit or two" so here is a new one from the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society who sound like they should know what they are talking about.

Ten Key Indicators Show Global Warming "Undeniable"[PlanetArk]

Melting glaciers, more humid air and eight other key indicators show that global warming is undeniable, scientists said on Wednesday, citing a new comprehensive review of the last decade of climate data.

Without addressing why this is happening, the researchers said there was no doubt that every decade on Earth since the 1980s has been hotter than the previous one, and that the planet has been warming for the last half-century.

This confirms the findings of the U.N. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, which reported in 2007 with 90 percent certainty that climate change is occurring. The IPCC also said that human activities contribute to this phenomenon.

The new report was released after U.S. Senate Democrats delayed any possible legislation to curb climate change until September at the earliest. Prospects for U.S. climate change legislation this year are considered slim.

Released by the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration as "The 2009 State of the Climate Report," the new report draws on the work of 303 scientists from 48 countries, including data from last year.

The 10 key planet-wide indicators of a warming climate identified by the report are:

1. Higher temperatures over land

2. Higher temperatures over oceans

3. Higher ocean heat content

4. Higher near-surface air temperatures (temperatures in the troposphere, where Earth's weather occurs)

5. Higher humidity

6. Higher sea surface temperatures

7. Higher sea levels

8. Less sea ice

9. Less snow cover

10. Shrinking glaciers

The seven indicators expected to rise in a warming world rose over the last decade, the report said; the three indicators expected to decline did so over that same period.

With an almost daily flood of data on climate change, Peter Thorne of the Cooperative Institute for Climate and Satellites in Asheville, North Carolina, saw the need for a comprehensive look at the information to pick the most obvious signs of planetary warming.

"These are indicators from the top of the atmosphere to the bottom of the ocean that we would expect to be changing in a warming world," Thorne said at a telephone briefing for reporters.

"Each indicator is changing as we would expect if the world truly were warming," he said. "Not a single analysis disagrees that the global climate is changing. The bottom line conclusion that the world's been warming is simply undeniable."

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Thursday, July 29, 2010

The demise of the Phytoplankton - the beginning of the end?

The Independent are renowned for their environmental front pages. Today they report on the recent Nature paper that shows that phytoplankton levels are down 40% and that this will ultimately lead to the collapse of fish stocks and eventually life on earth as we know it.

The dead sea: Global warming blamed for 40 per cent decline in the ocean's phytoplankton [Independent]

The microscopic plants that support all life in the oceans are dying off at a dramatic rate, according to a study that has documented for the first time a disturbing and unprecedented change at the base of the marine food web.

Scientists have discovered that the phytoplankton of the oceans has declined by about 40 per cent over the past century, with much of the loss occurring since the 1950s. They believe the change is linked with rising sea temperatures and global warming.

If the findings are confirmed by further studies it will represent the single biggest change to the global biosphere in modern times, even bigger than the destruction of the tropical rainforests and coral reefs, the scientists said yesterday.

Phytoplankton are microscopic marine organisms capable of photosynthesis, just like terrestrial plants. They float in the upper layers of the oceans, provide much of the oxygen we breathe and account for about half of the total organic matter on Earth. A 40 per cent decline would represent a massive change to the global biosphere.

"If this holds up, something really serious is underway and has been underway for decades. I've been trying to think of a biological change that's bigger than this and I can't think of one," said marine biologist Boris Worm of Canada's Dalhousie University in Halifax, Nova Scotia. He said: "If real, it means that the marine ecosystem today looks very different to what it was a few decades ago and a lot of this change is happening way out in the open, blue ocean where we cannot see it. I'm concerned about this finding."

The researchers studied phytoplankton records going back to 1899 when the measure of how much of the green chlorophyll pigment of phytoplankton was present in the upper ocean was monitored regularly. The scientists analysed about half a million measurements taken over the past century in 10 ocean regions, as well as measurements recorded by satellite.

They found that phytoplankton had declined significantly in all but two of the ocean regions at an average global rate of about 1 per cent per year, most of which since the mid 20th Century. They found that this decline correlated with a corresponding rise in sea-surface temperatures – although they cannot prove that warmer oceans caused the decline.

The study, published in the journal Nature, is the first analysis of its kind and deliberately used data gathered over such a long period of time to eliminate the sort of natural fluctuations in phytoplankton that are known to occur from one decade to the next due to normal oscillations in ocean temperatures, Dr Worm said. "Phytoplankton are a critical part of our planetary life support system. They produce half of the oxygen we breathe, draw down surface CO2 and ultimately support all of our fishes." he said.

But some scientists have warned that the Dalhousie University study may not present a realistic picture of the true state of marine plantlife given that phytoplankton is subject to wide, natural fluctuations.

"Its an important observation and it's consistent with other observations, but the overall trend can be overinterpreted because of the masking effect of natural variations," said Manuel Barange of the Plymouth Marine Laboratory and a phytoplankton expert.

However, the Dalhousie scientists behind the three-year study said they have taken the natural oscillations of ocean temperatures into account and the overall conclusion of a 40 per cent decline in phytoplankton over the past century still holds true.

"Phytoplankton are the basis of life in the oceans and are essential in maintaining the health of the oceans so we should be concerned about its decline.

"It's a very robust finding and we're very confident of it," said Daniel Boyce, the lead author of the study.

"Phytoplankton is the fuel on which marine ecosystems run. A decline of phytoplankton affects everything up the food chain, including humans," Dr Boyce said.

Phytoplankton is affected by the amount of nutrients the well up from the bottom of the oceans. In the North Atlantic phytoplankton "blooms" naturally in spring and autumn when ocean storms bring nutrients to the surface.

One effect of rising sea temperatures has been to make the water column of some regions nearer the equator more stratified, with warmer water sitting on colder layers of water, making it more difficult for nutrients to reach the phytoplankton at the sea surface.

Warmer seas in tropical regions are also known to have a direct effect on limiting the growth of phytoplankton.

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Floods and explosive chemicals in China

If floods were not bad enough (the current flood related death toll in China this year is around 1,000 and counting) the leaking of 1,000 barrels containing explosive chemicals into a major river is rather unfortunate.

It is reassuring that officials are testing the water quality which would strike me as a wise precaution.

China Floods Wash Explosive Chemicals Into River

Flooding in northeastern China has washed more than 1,000 barrels containing explosive chemicals into a major river, state media said on Wednesday, as the death toll from flooding nationally this year neared 1,000.

The incident happened along the flood-swollen Songhua River in Jilin city in Jilin province in the late morning, the official Xinhua news agency said.

Residents contacted by telephone said water supplies had been cut off for a time in parts of the city, but were starting to return to normal.

The containers, from a chemical plant, held more than 160,000 kg (352,700 lb) of explosive chemical fluids, Xinhua said, citing local officials.

"Emergency workers have been trying to recover the containers and local environmental protection authorities were closely monitoring the water quality of the river," the report said.

China periodically faces spills into rivers that result in water supplies being cut off, most seriously in 2005 when an explosion at an industrial plant sent toxic chemicals streaming into the Songhua River further upstream, in Harbin.

The incident forced the shut-down of water supplies to nearly 4 million people.

Rains so far this year across large swathes of central and southern China have killed 928 people and left 477 missing, causing around 176.5 billion yuan ($26.04 billion) in damage, Xinhua said.

A total of 875,000 homes have collapsed, 9.61 million people have been evacuated and 8.76 million hectares of crops ruined, it added.

Northeastern China has also been lashed by torrential rains over the past few days.

"Rat in the kitchen - unleash the foxes of war" - fur farm externalities

It is always good to read of a positive environmental externality related to an otherwise distasteful activity.

To quench the demand of rich people for real fox fur coats China has a number of silver fox farms. Instead of living a rather dull life before being murdered for their fur to drape over the shoulders of the elites the foxes have been sold on to actually do something useful - catching rats.

It is interesting to learn that close rat catching substitutes for foxes are chickens and ducks. The ducks I know do not strike me as the most efficient rat killers but perhaps these are especially trained ducks.

This story reminds me of the old woman and the fly. I fully expect to read in a year or so that China has unleashed a load of farmed tigers to kill off the plague of silver foxes.

China Trains Fur Farm Foxes To Combat Rat Plague


Authorities in China's far west have bred and trained "an army" of silver foxes bought from a fur farm to fight a plague of rats threatening a huge expanse of grasslands, state media said on Wednesday.

The Xinjiang government bought 20 foxes in 2004 and they have since increased to 284 and been released into the wild, the official Xinhua news agency said.

"Foxes are excellent natural predators of the rodent. One fox can catch about 20 rats per day. There has been a decline in the rat population in several counties where the measure has been adopted," it quoted official Ni Yifei as saying.

Rat numbers have exploded due to unusually dry conditions and threaten more than 5.5 million hectares of grasslands, the report said.

In one of the areas where the foxes have been released, rat numbers have dropped 70 percent, it added.

"The silver fox was chosen to be the rat fighter for its distinctive ability to run, hunt and live under the harsh living conditions on the prairie," Ni said.

Silver foxes are more normally bred in Xinjiang for their rich fur, used to make clothing.

Other parts of Xinjiang are using wolves, eagles and even chickens and ducks to control rat numbers, Xinhua said.

"It is a green way to tackle the rat problem," added another official, Lin Jun.

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"Resource Rents; When to Spend and How to Save"

Professor Tony Venables (Oxford) is a world renowned trade economist with previous papers and books that are scattered liberally throughout my PhD and trade papers. He led the "new economic geography" revolution alongside Paul Krugman back in the early 1990s.

He has now seen the "green" light and is working on environmental issues. His career therefore mirrors my own albeit at a much higher academic level :-(

I still object to the CEPR $5 a shot money making machine for working papers. Outdated and frustrating for those economists for whom the cost is prohibitive (PhD students, academics in developing countries etc.) Seems to me to be against the spirit of academia and dissemination of ideas and results.

"Resource Rents; When to Spend and How to Save"

CEPR Discussion Paper No. DP7875
ANTHONY J. VENABLES, University of Oxford - Department of Economics, Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR)

Countries with substantial revenues from renewable resources face a complex range of revenue management issues. What is the optimal time profile of consumption from the revenue, and how much should be saved? Should saving be invested in foreign funds or in the domestic economy? How does government policy influence the private sector, where sustainable growth in the domestic economy must ultimately be generated? This paper develops the issues in a simple two-period model, and argues that analysis must go well beyond the simple permanent income approach sometimes recommended. In developing countries resource revenues relax constraints on the supplies of capital and of government funds. The level of saving should be somewhat lower than under the permanent income hypothesis because of the low income of the current generation. The composition of investment should be tilted to the domestic economy rather than foreign assets. Government prudence can be undermined by private sector expectations, so high levels of spending on public infrastructure may be appropriate as a commitment to invest.

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Monday, July 26, 2010

WTO and natural resource cooperation

I could have called this post - "globalisation and the environment".

Next week I will be lecturing to Chevening scholars on "Climate Change, Trade and Development" that will consider the increasingly complex relationship between trade negotiations and environmental post 2012 negotiations.

How much overlap is there? Should there be any overlap?

The Doha round needs a considerable section on environmental compliance given the increasing use of environmental regulations that act as "secondary trade barriers". The WTO is central to progress in this area.

A forthcoming World Bank report by De Melo and Mathys will look at this issue is much more detail.

It is interesting therefore to see that WTO pushing forward on this issue.

WTO Seeks More Cooperation In Natural Resource Trade [PlanetArk]
The World Trade Organization called on Friday for countries to work together more closely in trade in natural resources -- an area often seen as exempt from many international commerce rules.

Governments must cooperate more intensively to deal with the challenges for both importing and exporting countries in trade in natural resources, such as export restrictions and import tariffs, it said in its annual World Trade Report.

"In a world where scarce natural resource endowments must be nurtured and managed with care, uncooperative trade policies could have a particularly damaging effect on global welfare," the report said.

The report defines natural resources as fuels, forestry, mining and fisheries -- goods that are found naturally and can be used with minimal processing. It excludes agriculture, where products are cultivated not extracted, and industrial goods employing minerals that require a high level of processing.

Trade in such goods in 2008 was $3.7 trillion in 2008, or nearly 24 percent of total world trade in merchandise goods, a share that has been rising by 20 percent a year for the last decade, reflecting rising commodity prices.

"I believe not only that there is room for mutually beneficial negotiating trade-offs that encompass natural resources trade, but also that a failure to address these issues could be a recipe for a growing tension in international trade relations," WTO Director-General Pascal Lamy said in a foreword to the report.

EXHAUSTIBLE RESOURCES

WTO rules allow countries to restrict exports of natural resources to preserve an exhaustible resource.

Zhao Hong, a diplomat at China's mission to the WTO, said at the launch of the report in Geneva that WTO members had inalienable rights to the resources on their territory, while WTO rules allowed them to pursue goals such as environmental protection or sustainable development.

The United States, European Union and Mexico have complained to the WTO about China's restrictions on raw materials, and the WTO itself has questioned whether these are effective.

Such restrictions, as well as measures by importing countries, are open to legal challenge, said Joost Pauwelyn, professor of international law at Geneva's Graduate Institute for International Studies.

It was an "urban myth" that natural resources are not covered by the WTO, he said at the launch.

For instance a country could not claim to use export restrictions to preserve resources if it did not restrict domestic consumption.

Similarly production restrictions by a country that exports almost its entire output of a natural resource could be challenged as an export restraint, while consumption taxes on a country that relies on imports for a product could be seen as tariff open to challenge.

Still, trade in natural resources is not the same as other products, as it raises environmental issues and competition is limited as production cannot be switched to other locations.

"Natural resources and energy are unevenly distributed between countries as well as fixed. BP will confirm this: you cannot move an oil well," Pauwelyn said.

Pauwelyn said he could envisage negotiations where exporters agreed to curb their export restraints in exchange for importers limiting carbon tariffs.

The report shows that non-WTO member Russia was the biggest exporter of natural resources in 2008, with a value of $341 billion, while the United States is the biggest importer, taking in $583 billion.

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Friday, July 16, 2010

Determining the value of the planet: But who is buying?

Economists can pretty much put a value on anything which is why economists tend to be universally disliked. People tend not to take too kindly to having a monetary figure placed on their or their families lives for example.

Now the planet is to be valued. It is sure to cost a pretty penny that is for sure. Whether anyone can afford it is another matter. Even Bill Gates would have to take out a mortgage.

So, to the big question. Do we need a UN body to hire some fresh PhDs to grind out some meaningless numbers that everyone will ignore (except for me who will put them into Environmental Economics 201).

Analysis: New U.N. Body To Put Value On Planet [PlanetArk]

The world relies on a range of services nature provides -- water filtration by forests, pollination by bees and a supply of wild plant genes for new food crops or medicines.

If nature charged for these, how much would it cost?

Most such values are excluded from measures of national economies and from prices and markets which would force businesses and governments to recognize them, and the result has been a bias toward development over conservation.

U.N. states have proposed a new body, the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES), to advise on valuing nature and conservation targets.

An early priority should be measurement, said Pavan Sukhdev, study leader for The Economics of Ecosystems and Biodiversity (TEEB) U.N. initiative, which published a business and biodiversity report this week.

"For a country to say 'let's increase biodiversity', it's quite difficult because it's not measuring biodiversity," Sukhdev said.

"That is a big challenge for the IPBES, to create a right set of metrics. The logical sequence is first establish what is biodiversity, what are you measuring, agree on it, so that countries are doing it pretty much the same way."

The U.N. General Assembly is expected officially to endorse IPBES later this year.

"It's bringing the world's best scientists together under an inter-governmental body, so governments can commission specific questions to that body, to provide them with guidance," said Achim Steiner, executive director of the United Nations Environment Program.

In a further political step, on the agenda at a U.N. meeting in October in Japan is an "access and benefit-sharing" regime for countries which are home to plants and other species valued by agriculture or the pharmaceutical industry.

The idea is to give such countries a share of profits from product development.

"It has major implications for the economic benefit of conserving biodiversity," said Steiner.

MARKETS

Damage to natural capital including forests, wetlands and grasslands is valued at $2-4.5 trillion annually, U.N. reports estimate, a figure excluded from measures of the global economy, or GDP.

Of 48,000 species assessed for extinction risk as of 2009, some 2 percent were already extinct or extinct in the wild, says the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN).

Part of the difficulty in recognizing nature is the problem of assessing its various services using economic markets.

In the fight against climate change, a pure market approach has been devised to put a value on carbon-free air in the European Union's emissions trading scheme, by generating tradable carbon permits.

While some of nature's services could be similarly traded as commodities, such as proposed "rainforest bonds" which would pay for forests' wildlife, fresh water and carbon storage, most biodiversity cannot be valued or traded directly.

"We should probably be thinking about biodiversity less like the carbon market and more like a real estate market, these are very distinctive, unique assets, they can be graded and valued but they're not interchangeable," said Joshua Bishop, chief economist at the IUCN.

"It's not a commodity like carbon dioxide."

Less direct, private sector opportunities indirectly tied to conservation are booming, such as eco-tourism and organic food, UNEP argued this week in its business and biodiversity report.

And forest markets were still on track, said Sukhdev, pointing to a deal to raise about $4 billion to pay tropical forested countries not to chop their trees.

"It is complex but at the same time I think there is a huge willingness," said Sukhdev. "It will take time."

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Wednesday, July 14, 2010

The Shocking CO2 statistics (in picture form)

Nothing beats a good picture. The final line about happier cows is subject to the age old "is a none existent cow happier than a cow executed to feed our desire to eat the flesh of dead animals".


To see this poster in all it's glory please click on those clever "cheap flights" marketers over at fly.co.uk.

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Tuesday, July 13, 2010

4th World Congress papers

The following post is a list of the papers I attended at the World Congress. This post may be of limited interest to many readers but at least gives an insight into the papers that this humble blogger is interested in. A lot of trade, some catastrophes and a little valuation made up stuff.

I would hazard that this represents a way above average conference attendance record in case the powers that be are reading.

The overall quality of the papers was good to middling with the occassional paper of great quality and some papers that still required a little more polishing.

A book of abstracts can be found HERE.

The programme can be found HERE.

Tuesday June 29th 8.45-10.30

QUANTIFYING THE ECONOMIC DAMAGE DUE TO HURRICANE STRIKES: AN ANALYSIS FROM OUTER
SPACE FOR THE CARIBBEAN REGION
Presenter(s): Eric Strobl, Ecole Polytechnique
Co-author(s): Luisito Bertinelli

ECONOMIC VALUATION OF THE INFLUENCE OF INVASIVE ALIEN SPECIES ON THE ECONOMY OF THE
SEYCHELLES ISLANDS
Presenter(s): Paul Mwebaze, Australia National University
Discussant(s): Eric Strobl

TO TRADE OR NOT TO TRADE: FIRM-LEVEL ANALYSIS OF EMISSIONS TRADING IN SANTIAGO, CHILE
Presenter(s): Jessica Coria, University of Gothenburg
Co-author(s): Åsa Löfgren and Thomas Sterner

ISO 14001 ADOPTION IN MEXICO: DRIVERS AND IMPACTS
Presenter(s): Allen Blackman, Resources for the Future

KEYNOTE

THE ENVIRONMENT AND DIRECTED TECHNICAL CHANGE
Daron Acemoglu, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

14:00 - 15:45 Evaluating the Economic Impacts of Environmental
Regulation using Microdata (Special session)

LOCAL ENVIRONMENTAL REGULATION AND PLANT-LEVEL PRODUCTIVITY
Presenter(s): Randy Becker, U.S. Census Bureau

WHAT IS THE IMPACT OF EMISSIONS TRADING ON PRODUCTIVITY AND TECHNICAL CHANGE?
Presenter(s): Ronald Shadbegian, U.S. EPA - NCEE
Co-author(s): Cynthia Morgan and Carl Pasurka

THE EFFECTIVENESS OF QUASI-REGULATORY MECHANISMS ON POLLUTING BEHAVIOR: THE CASE OF
POLLUTION PREVENTION PROGRAMS AND TOXIC RELEASES
Presenter(s): Linda Bui, Brandeis University

ENERGY ABUNDANCE, TRADE AND INDUSTRY LOCATION
Presenter(s): Nicole Mathys, Swiss Federal Office of Energy and University of Neuchatel
Co-author(s): Reyer Gerlagh

16:15 - 18:00 Climate Change and Extreme Events: From Mere
Disasters to Mega-catastrophes (Special session)

RESPONDING TO THREATS OF CLIMATE CHANGE MEGA-CATASTROPHES
Presenter(s): Carolyn Kousky, Resources for the Future
Co-author(s): Olga Rostapshova, Mike Toman and Richard Zeckhauser

THE IMPACT OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON GLOBAL TROPICAL STORM DAMAGES
Presenter(s): Robert Mendelsohn, Yale University
Co-author(s): Shun Chonabayashi and Kerry Emanuel

CLIMATE TREATIES AND APPROACHING CATASTROPHES
Presenter(s): Scott Barrett, Columbia University

EXTREME WEATHER RISKS AND MIGRATION: TORNADOES
Presenter(s): Trudy Ann Cameron, University of Oregon
Co-author(s): Eric Duquette

GHG TARGETS AS INSURANCE AGAINST CATASTROPHIC CLIMATE DAMAGES
Presenter(s): Martin Weitzman, Harvard University

08:45 - 10:30 Environmental Valuation: Methodology II Room R-M140

TESTING THE THEORETICAL CONSISTENCY OF STATED PREFERENCES FOR TROPICAL WILDLIFE
CONSERVATION
Presenter(s): Ian Bateman, University of East Anglia and Silvia Ferrini, CSERGE, University of East Anglia
Co-author(s): Neil Burgess, Andreas Kontoleon, Sian Morse-Jones and R. Kerry Turner

WHEN ARE PREFERENCES CONSISTENT? A CLASSIFICATION OF CHOICE DOMAINS AND
EXPLORATION OF EMPIRICAL EVIDENCE
Presenter(s): Felix Schläpfer, ETH Zurich, Instiute for Environmental Decisions

KEYNOTE

EVALUATING POLICIES TO INCREASE THE USE OF RENEWABLE ENERGY
Richard Schmalensee, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

14:00 - 15:45 Demography and Environment Room R-M150

THE DEMOGRAPHIC TRANSITION AND THE ECOLOGICAL TRANSITION: ENRICHING THE
ENVIRONMENTAL KUZNETS CURVE HYPOTHESIS
Presenter(s): Marzio Galeotti, University of Milan, IEFE-Bocconi
Co-author(s): Alessandro Lanza

THE IMPACT OF LIFESTYLES ON CO2 EMISSIONS IN THE UK: AN INPUT-OUTPUT AND GEODEMOGRAPHIC
DATA APPROACH
Presenter(s): Giovanni Baiocchi, Durham University
Co-author(s): Klaus Hubacek and Jan Minx

IMPROVING EMPIRICAL ESTIMATION OF DEMOGRAPHIC DRIVERS: MALARIA ECOLOGY AND CHILD
MORTALITY
Presenter(s): Gordon McCord, Columbia University
Co-author(s): Dalton Conley and Jeffrey Sachs

LIFE EXPECTANCY AND THE ENVIRONMENT
Presenter(s): Agustín Pérez-Barahona, INRA & École Polytechnique
Co-author(s): Fabio Mariani and Natacha Raffin

16:15 - 18:00 Effectiveness of Voluntary Environmental Initiatives
for Pollution Reduction II (Special session)

RE-ASSESSMENT OF THE IMPACT OF EPA'S VOLUNTARY 33/50 PROGRAM ON TOXIC RELEASES
Presenter(s): Xiang Bi, University of Illinois
Co-author(s): Madhu Khanna

DOES SELF-REGULATION REDUCE POLLUTION? RESPONSIBLE CARE IN THE CHEMICALS INDUSTRY
Presenter(s): Shanti Gamper-Rabindran, University of Pittsburgh
Co-author(s): Stephen Finger

ECONOMIC AND INSTITUTIONAL FACTORS IN BUSINESS ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT
Presenter(s): David Ervin, Portland State University

DOES POLLUTION PREVENTION REDUCE TOXIC EMISSIONS? A DYNAMIC PANEL DATA MODEL
Presenter(s): Donna Harrington, University of Vermont
Co-author(s): George Deltas and Madhu Khanna

08:45 - 10:30 Special Session in Honour of Peter Bohm Room R-M510

THE TRUTH, THE WHOLE TRUTH AND NOTHING BUT THE TRUTH: A MULTI-COUNTRY TEST OF AN OATH SCRIPT
Presenter(s): Mitesh Kataria, U of Gothenburg
Co-author(s): Fredrik Carlsson, Susie Chung, Alan Krupnick, Elina Lampi, Asa Lofgren, Ping Qin and Thomas
Sterner

BUY COAL! DEPOSIT MARKETS PREVENT CARBON LEAKAGE
Presenter(s): Bard Harstad, Northwestern University

ECOLOGICAL INTUITION VERSUS ECONOMIC REASON
Presenter(s): Roger Guesnerie , College de France

KEYNOTE

LEARNING TO LIVE IN A GLOBAL COMMONS: SOCIOECONOMIC CHALLENGES FOR A SUSTAINABLE
ENVIRONMENT
Simon Levin, Princeton University

14:00 - 15:45 International Trade III Room DS-M220

HOW DOES INTRA-INDUSTRY TRADE AFFECT THE ENVIRONMENT?
Presenter(s): Sarma Aralas, Michigan State University
Co-author(s): John Hoehn

GLOBALIZATION OF THE CARBON MARKET: AN ECONOMIC EFFICIENCY AND INTERNATIONAL TRADE
ANALYSIS
Presenter(s): Victoria Alexeeva-Talebi, Centre for European Economic Research (ZEW), Mannheim
Co-author(s): Niels Anger

ENVIRONMENTAL REGULATIONS AND BILATERAL TRADE FLOWS
Presenter(s): Tetsuya Tsurumi, The University of Tokyo
Co-author(s): Akira Hibiki and Shunsuke Managi

DO NATIONAL BORDERS MATTER? INTRANATIONAL TRADE, INTERNATIONAL TRADE, AND THE
ENVIRONMENT
Presenter(s): Carol McAusland, University of British Columbia
Co-author(s): Daniel Millimet

16:15 - 18:00 Resource, Trade and Growth (Special session) Room DS-M220

FOREIGN DIRECT INVESTMENT AND NATURAL RESOURCES
Presenter(s): Frederick van der Ploeg, Oxford University
Co-author(s): Steven Poelhekke

RESOURCE WEALTH, INNOVATION AND GROWTH IN THE GLOBAL ECONOMY
Presenter(s): Pietro Peretto, Duke University
Co-author(s): Simone Valente

INTERNATIONAL TRADE, NATURAL RESOURCE ABUNDANCE AND ECONOMIC GROWTH
Presenter(s): Beatriz Gaitan, Dept. of Economics
Co-author(s): Terry Roe

ENDOGENOUS GROWTH, ASYMMETRIC TRADE AND RESOURCE DEPENDENCE
Presenter(s): Simone Valente, ETH Zurich
Co-author(s): Lucas Bretschger

08:45 ‐ 10:30 International Trade IV: Empirics Room DS‐M220

THE POLLUTION TERMS OF TRADE AND MANUFACTURING
Presenter(s): Joel Bruneau, University of Saskatchewan

POLLUTION HAVENS: EMPIRICAL EVIDENCE FOR GERMANY
Presenter(s): Wilhelm Althammer, HHL‐Leipzig Graduate School of Management
Co‐author(s): Christine Mutz

TRADE IN ‘VIRTUAL CARBON’: EMPIRICAL RESULTS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR POLICY
Presenter(s): Giovanni Ruta, LSE
Co‐author(s): Giles Atkinson, Kirk Hamilton and Dominique Van Der Mensbrugghe

UNRAVELING THE SIMULTANEITY OF ENVIRONMENT AND TRADE IN INDIA
Presenter(s): Badal Mukhopadhyay, The Energy Research Institute (TERI)
Co‐author(s): Kanupriya Gupta

KEYNOTE

CLIMATE POLICY: TOWARD A NEW INTERNATIONAL INFRASTRUCTURE?
Jean Tirole, Toulouse School of Economics

14:00 ‐ 15:45 International Trade V Room DS‐M220

SUBGLOBAL CLIMATE AGREEMENTS AND THE COPPER MINING INDUSTRY
Presenter(s): Bruno Lanz, ETH Zurich and MIT
Co‐author(s): Thomas Rutherford and John E. Tilton

TRADE, ENVIRONMENTAL REGULATIONS AND INDUSTRIAL MOBILITY: AN INDUSTRY‐LEVEL STUDY FORJAPAN
Presenter(s): Robert Elliott, University of Birmingham
Co‐author(s): Matthew Cole and Toshi Okubo


CAN CARBON BASED IMPORT TARIFFS EFFECTIVELY REDUCE CARBON EMISSIONS?
Presenter(s): Michael Huebler, Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research

THE TRADE BIAS OF TAX REBATES FOR HYBRID VEHICLES
Presenter(s): Sumeet Gulati, University of British Columbia
Co‐author(s): Nisha Malhotra and Carol McAusland

Note the graveyard shift for my paper although there was a good turn out and some excellent environmental economists in the audience.

More reports later.

Back in Action

After a long lay off due to travels to China and the the World Congress in Montreal I am back blogging. One can lose the blogging habbit quite quickly I have discovered and bogging is also highly negatively correlated with the amount of real work one has to do.

We return with an interesting picture of the Gulf Oil spill superimposed onto London. Wow - it looks quite big now.


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